Lilies #1619AR, 1564BR, 1565AR, 1569R, 1570AR & 1561BR

This slideshow requires JavaScript.

August 1, 2015

Lilies, whose scientific name is Lilium, has more than one hundred gorgeous species in its family. There are many plants that have lily in their common name; however, not all are true Lilies. Two examples of this misnomer are Day Lilies and Peace Lilies. True Lilies are mostly native throughout the temperate climate regions of the northern hemisphere of planet Earth, although their range can extend into the northern subtropics as well. This range extends across much of Europe, Asia, Japan and the Philippines and across southern Canada and throughout most of the United States.

Lilies are very easy to grow. They are not especially particular about soil neither type nor pH level. Their only requirement is well-drained soil. Lilies grow best in full sun; however, they may thrive in partial sun as well. An interesting fact about this plant is that most Lily bulbs have very thick roots that have the ability to pull the bulb down into the soil at a depth that is most optimum for their continued survival.

If I am fortunate to have you view my photographs and you find the color saturation too much or the color schemes of the mats do not match either themselves or the photograph, please let me know via a comment. Being color-blind, what might look great to me might look like sh*t to everyone else!

Steven H. Spring

Flowers #266CR, 262C, 258B, 262D & 266DR

This slideshow requires JavaScript.

July 25, 2015

Spiderworts, whose botanical name is Tradescantia, are a genus of approximately seventy-five species of perennial plants in the Commelinaceae plant family. Named for the English naturalist, gardener and explorer John Tradescant the elder (1570-1638) who traveled to far away lands in search of foreign flowers, the plant gets its common name because when its stems are cut or broken it secrets mucilage that hardens into web-like threads. The wort part of its name comes from the old English word for plant. The deer resistant and drought tolerant plant forms a dense, wide-spreading clump of weakly upright leaves, growing up to a height of three feet tall and three feet wide, depending on the variety. Some of the longer stems and leaves tend to sag, giving the plant an ungraceful look. However, for me, the exotic blooms of the Spiderwort more than make up for its ungraceful appearance. The individual leaves are blade-like, long and thin growing to a length of nearly twenty inches and come in a variety of different shades of green, ranging in color from blue-green to chartreuse.

Also commonly referred to as day-flowers because their blooms are open for less than a day, the flower’s delicate petals curl up during the afternoon heat. The flowers can remain open during cloudy days until evening. Composed of three sepals, three petals and six stamens, Spiderworts’ bright yellow anthers proudly stand upright in the middle of a fuzzy looking puffball of filaments that sit atop the triangular petals. The plant blooms during late spring through early summer, and the blossoms can be either purple, violet, pink or white, but are most commonly blue.

Native to the Americas, from as far north as southern Canada down to northern Argentina, including The West Indies, these flowers have become naturalized throughout parts of Europe, Asia, Africa and Australia. In the wild, North American Spiderworts are found in dry, sandy, sunny locales where they bloom in abundance for a short period of time, and also along the edges of wet woodlands where they can bloom for months. In the early years of the Seventeenth Century, Spiderworts were among the first native plants from the Americas to be introduced to European gardeners. An individual Spiderwort plant is self-sterile, in that by itself will not produce seeds, requiring a mate to do so.

Hardy in USDA zones three through ten,, Spiderworts are considered an easy to care for plant that prefers moist, well-drained, acidic (pH 5-6) soil, though it is adaptable to many different types of soil. The plant flowers best in full sun, however in regions with really hot summer days, partial shade is required. As summer days become longer and hotter, flowering comes to a stop and the plant may even go dormant. Spiderworts can re-bloom during cooler days of late summer and early fall if you cut the plant back by two-thirds after the blooming cycle ends, and by deadheading the spent blooms. Spiderworts should be divided every three or four years for propagation, either in the spring or early fall.

The type of Spiderwort shown in these photographs are Tradescantia Andersoniana. If I am fortunate to have you view my photographs and you find the color saturation too much or the color schemes of the mats do not match either themselves or the photograph, please let me know via a comment. Being color-blind, what might look great to me might look like sh*t to everyone else!

Steven H. Spring

Lilies #1651AR, 1645AR, 1655CR, 1648BR & 1641AR

This slideshow requires JavaScript.

July 19, 2015

Any one who has checked out my photography over the past three or four years, be it on WordPress or Facebook, probably knows that I like to shoot flowers extremely close up. I find the inner workings of a plant’s blooms to be stunning, both in their color and configurations. Flowers are truly amazing. However, I sometimes forget to see the big picture, and thus failing to shoot it. And, if truth be told, I went back into my apartment to grab my camera as to take some close-up photos of this lily after spotting it while taking one of my frequent walks around my limited gardens.

As it was early evening, I grabbed my tri-pod and shutter release cable as well, to give me some stability while shooting during what is commonly referred to as one of photography’s two golden hours. It was when setting up, that I realized as gorgeous as the lily was, the overall picture was the money shot. Having learned a very valuable lesson that day, I guess one could say that I never saw the forest for all the trees.

Maybe one of these days, I will finally shoot some decent photos.

Steven H. Spring

Flowers #235C, 245B, 247B, 243ER, 238E & 252B

This slideshow requires JavaScript.

July 11, 2015

Spiderworts, whose botanical name is Tradescantia, are a genus of approximately seventy-five species of perennial plants in the Commelinaceae plant family. Named for the English naturalist, gardener and explorer John Tradescant the elder (1570-1638) who traveled to far away lands in search of foreign flowers, the plant gets its common name because when its stems are cut or broken it secrets mucilage that hardens into web-like threads. The wort part of its name comes from the old English word for plant. The deer resistant and drought tolerant plant forms a dense, wide-spreading clump of weakly upright leaves, growing up to a height of three feet tall and three feet wide, depending on the variety. Some of the longer stems and leaves tend to sag, giving the plant an ungraceful look. However, for me, the exotic blooms of the Spiderwort more than make up for its ungraceful appearance. The individual leaves are blade-like, long and thin growing to a length of nearly twenty inches and come in a variety of different shades of green, ranging in color from blue-green to chartreuse.

Also commonly referred to as day-flowers because their blooms are open for less than a day, the flower’s delicate petals curl up during the afternoon heat. The flowers can remain open during cloudy days until evening. Composed of three sepals, three petals and six stamens, Spiderworts’ bright yellow anthers proudly stand upright in the middle of a fuzzy looking puffball of filaments that sit atop the triangular petals. The plant blooms during late spring through early summer, and the blossoms can be either purple, violet, pink or white, but are most commonly blue.

Native to the Americas, from as far north as southern Canada down to northern Argentina, including The West Indies, these flowers have become naturalized throughout parts of Europe, Asia, Africa and Australia. In the wild, North American Spiderworts are found in dry, sandy, sunny locales where they bloom in abundance for a short period of time, and also along the edges of wet woodlands where they can bloom for months. In the early years of the Seventeenth Century, Spiderworts were among the first native plants from the Americas to be introduced to European gardeners. An individual Spiderwort plant is self-sterile, in that by itself will not produce seeds, requiring a mate to do so.

Hardy in USDA zones three through ten,, Spiderworts are considered an easy to care for plant that prefers moist, well-drained, acidic (pH 5-6) soil, though it is adaptable to many different types of soil. The plant flowers best in full sun, however in regions with really hot summer days, partial shade is required. As summer days become longer and hotter, flowering comes to a stop and the plant may even go dormant. Spiderworts can re-bloom during cooler days of late summer and early fall if you cut the plant back by two-thirds after the blooming cycle ends, and by deadheading the spent blooms. Spiderworts should be divided every three or four years for propagation, either in the spring or early fall.

The type of Spiderwort shown in these photographs are Tradescantia Andersoniana. If I am fortunate to have you view my photographs and you find the color saturation too much or the color schemes of the mats do not match either themselves or the photograph, please let me know via a comment. Being color-blind, what might look great to me might look like sh*t to everyone else!

Steven H. Spring

 

Fireworks #202E

Fireworks #202EJuly 4, 2015

Earlier this week, when gathering some photographs together to post tonight, I originally had chosen some really neat shots of flowers.  However, when I noticed that today’s date was July 4th, I immediately knew that I just had to post some fireworks instead.

This photo was shot on film many years ago.  The 4×6 print was scanned onto my computer where some digital manipulation was done to enhance the original print.

Steven H. Spring

Daffodils #47BR, 44BR, 45AR, 46BR, 45CR & 43BR

This slideshow requires JavaScript.

June 27, 2015

Daffodils, whose botanical name is Narcissus, are a perennial flowering plant in the Amaryllidaceae family. Native to the meadows and woods of southwestern Europe and northern Africa over through western Asia, Daffodils were introduced to the Far East by the tenth century and have since been widely naturalized. The Prophet Mohammed referenced the plant in sixth century writings and recorded history date as far back as 300 B.C. With as many as one hundred wild species (the actual number is debated), cultivated hybrids now number more than thirteen thousand varieties.

Known for its early spring bloom cycle, Daffodils are a vigorous, long-lived flower that grows to a height of twenty inches, depending on the variety, with even a miniature version growing only six inches tall. Leaf-less stems grow up in the middle of long, narrow green or bluish-green leaves, producing most often only a single bloom. The flower consists of three petals, three sepals and a central corona, which is often called the trumpet or cup, depending on its size. The flowers are predominately white or yellow, although hybrids now include orange, green and pink.

The plant likes a full or partial sun with slightly acidic, well-drained soil. Bulbs should be planted in the autumn at a depth of three times the size of the bulb. Known as an easy to grow plant requiring little maintenance, Daffodils produce lycorine, a bitter poison that makes the plant deer and rodent resistant. After the plant is finished flowering, let its leaves mature and yellow before topping them off. Cutting the foliage before it ages can reduce the plant’s vitality and longevity. Bulbs should be dug up and divided every few years to prevent overcrowding.

If I am fortunate to have you view my photographs and you find the color saturation too much or the color schemes of the mats do not match either themselves or the photograph, please let me know via a comment. Being color-blind, what might look great to me might look like sh*t to everyone else!

Steven H. Spring

Daffodils #26HR, 27GR, 30BR, 29BR, 27IR & 26IR

This slideshow requires JavaScript.

June 20, 2015

Daffodils, whose botanical name is Narcissus, are a perennial flowering plant in the Amaryllidaceae family. Native to the meadows and woods of southwestern Europe and northern Africa over through western Asia, Daffodils were introduced to the Far East by the tenth century and have since been widely naturalized. The Prophet Mohammed referenced the plant in sixth century writings and recorded history date as far back as 300 B.C. With as many as one hundred wild species (the actual number is debated), cultivated hybrids now number more than thirteen thousand varieties.

Known for its early spring bloom cycle, Daffodils are a vigorous, long-lived flower that grows to a height of twenty inches, depending on the variety, with even a miniature version growing only six inches tall. Leaf-less stems grow up in the middle of long, narrow green or bluish-green leaves, producing most often only a single bloom. The flower consists of three petals, three sepals and a central corona, which is often called the trumpet or cup, depending on its size. The flowers are predominately white or yellow, although hybrids now include orange, green and pink.

The plant likes a full or partial sun with slightly acidic, well-drained soil. Bulbs should be planted in the autumn at a depth of three times the size of the bulb. Known as an easy to grow plant requiring little maintenance, Daffodils produce lycorine, a bitter poison that makes the plant deer and rodent resistant. After the plant is finished flowering, let its leaves mature and yellow before topping them off. Cutting the foliage before it ages can reduce the plant’s vitality and longevity. Bulbs should be dug up and divided every few years to prevent overcrowding.

If I am fortunate to have you view my photographs and you find the color saturation too much or the color schemes of the mats do not match either themselves or the photograph, please let me know via a comment. Being color-blind, what might look great to me might look like sh*t to everyone else!

Steven H. Spring