Lilies #3284AR, 3380BR, 3381BR, 3382BR & 3285BR

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August 12, 2017

Lilies, whose scientific name is Lilium, has more than one hundred gorgeous species in its family. However, there are many plants that have Lily in their common name; yet not all are true Lilies. A few examples of this misnomer are Day Lilies, Calla Lilies, Peace Lilies, Water Lilies and Lilies Of The Valley. True Lilies are mostly native throughout the temperate climate regions of the northern hemisphere of planet Earth, although their range can extend into the northern subtropics as well. This range extends across much of Europe, Asia, Japan and the Philippines and across southern Canada and throughout most of the United States.

There are a number of different sub-species of Lilies, such as Oriental, Asiatic, Trumpet, Martagon, Longiflorum, Candidum and several others. The most commonly grown are the Orientals and the Asiatics, especially for gardeners in more northern regions. Both the Oriental and Asiatic sub-species are hybrids. They are possibly my most favorite flower to photograph, as their design and colors makes it so easy to do so. Friends might think I am a little nuts when I tell them that they like having their picture taken, as they are so photogenic.

Asiatic Lilies, who gets its name because they are native to central and eastern Asia, are probably the easiest to grow, reproduce effortlessly and are very winter hardy. A healthy bulb can often double in size from one season to the next, and produces many smaller bulblets near the surface of the soil. Asiatics can reach heights up to six feet tall and have long, slim, glossy leaves, all the while producing flowers in a wide variety of colors, including white, pink, plum, yellow, orange and red. The one color in which they do not bloom is true blue. Blooming in June and July (depending on one’s region), the flowers produce no fragrance, unlike that of Orientals. Another distinguishing difference between the two is its petals. Whereas Asiatics have smooth edges, Orientals are rough.

Oriental Lilies, native to Japan, are a little harder to grow and tend to reproduce much more slowly, mainly by bulblets sprouting near the surface of the soil. They look somewhat like a football when they first surface from the soil, rather pointy, and its leaves hugging the stem tightly. Their deep green leaves are wider, further apart and less numerous than those of the Asiatics, which first come into sight similar to an artichoke in appearance. Orientals are usually taller than Asiatics, reaching a height up to eight feel tall. Because of their height, many refer to them as Tree Lilies.

Orientals tend to bloom in pastel shades of white, yellow and pink, although some such as Stargazers and Starfighters produce very deep pink blooms. One more characteristic difference between the two types is that Orientals often will be rimmed with a different color, or having two or three colors, whereas the Asiatics most often have just a single color, although there are some exceptions. This sub-specie of Lilies also blooms after Asiatics, usually in August and September, again depending on your region. Other sub-species, such as Trumpets, bloom even later, so it is possible to have Lilies blooming all summer long by planting different varieties.

Most Lilies are very easy to grow. They are not especially particular about soil neither type nor pH level. Their only requirement is a well-draining soil. Lilies grow best in full sun; however, they may thrive in partial sun as well. An interesting fact about this plant is that most Lily bulbs have very thick roots that have the ability to pull the bulb down into the soil at a depth that is most optimum for their continued survival.

If I am fortunate to have you view my photographs and you find the color saturation too much or the color schemes of the mats do not match either themselves or the photograph, please let me know via a comment. Being color-blind, what might look great to me might look like sh*t to everyone else!

Steven H. Spring
Earth

America v. North Korea

August 10, 2017

Tuesday morning, I awoke to news that America is about to become militarily engaged in the Philippines, chasing ISIL rebels throughout the jungle nation. I spent a lot of time in the PI (that’s what sailors called it) while in the Navy during the late ‘70s. Even back then, we were warned to avoid certain areas of the archipelago because of guerilla rebels fighting back against the tyrannical rule of Ferdinand Marcos, whom we helped remain in power and very wealthy, all the while his countrymen lived in extreme poverty.

Great, I thought, just what we need, yet one more military endeavor to go along with all the others. Since the horrific attack on September 11, 2001, the U.S. has invaded or are conducting drone missile attacks in Iraq, Afghanistan, Pakistan, Libya, Yemen, Somalia and Syria. This does not include smaller, ongoing operations such as sending “advisors” and aircraft into Uganda in 2011 in search of Joseph Kony, or the three hundred troops sent to Cameroon in 2015 to help that nation combat its own rebels. Not to mention the occasional talk of taking aggressive action against Iran. Now, the president wants to add the Philippines to this ever-growing list?

When I turned on the television later that evening to catch up on the day’s news, I was shocked to hear potential war in the PI was no longer news, and that in response to Pentagon intelligence reports indicating that North Korea now has a miniature nuclear warhead capable of being launched atop an ICBM missile, the president boasted that country would be “met with fire and fury like the world has never seen.” Before nuclear war breaks out on the Korean peninsula, we must remember that the Pentagon said the very same thing four years ago.

With a nuclear triad consisting of sixty-eight hundred missiles capable of striking anywhere on Earth, why are we so worried because one more country might have the ability to so do with one nuke? I am as much a pacifist as Edwin Starr, and despise nukes even as a means of electrical power, let alone weapons of mass destruction, but what gives us the right to possess nuclear weapons, yet no other country, or just a select few has the right to do the same? Kim Jong-un might appear hell-bent on waging war on America, but is he really crazy enough to face annihilation of his country by launching a single nuke at America?

With an annual defense budget of nearly $900 billion, we spend nearly as much on our military as the rest of the world combined. When combined with our intelligence agencies, we spend nearly $1.5 trillion on defense and intelligence related expenditures every year. Moreover, this does not include America’s ultra secret intelligence budget. Since September 11th, our government has built up such a top-secret network of intelligence agencies that no one knows how much it cost, how many it employs or how many agencies it runs. The defense budget itself has nearly doubled since 2000, yet where has all this spending gotten us? As a nation, we live in fear of another September 11th attack; all the while, our country is falling apart. America is bankrupting itself and it is not from our spending on Social Security, Medicare and Medicaid. It is from our imperialistic attitude and our attempt to dominate the world we call planet Earth.

In a rather sad, ironic twist, America is by far the world’s largest arms dealer, again nearly selling as many armaments as the rest of the world combined. Thus, not only are we bankrupting ourselves with our military spending, but we are also heavily arming the rest of the world. One must remember that America armed Saddam Hussein when he was at war with Iran in the 1980s and we armed Osama bin Laden when he fought the Russians in Afghanistan, also during the ‘80s. America has a very extensive history of arming and supporting malevolence dictators and lunatics, in the name of what is best for this country, not necessarily what is best for the rest of the world.

In his January 17, 1961 farewell address to the nation, President Dwight D. Eisenhower warned the country to beware of the mighty military-industrial complex. President Eisenhower stated “…we must guard against the acquisition of unwarranted influence, whether sought or unsought, by the military-industrial complex. The potential for the disastrous rise of misplaced power exists and will persist.” Coming from a five-star general, America should have listened.

Steven H. Spring
Earth

Iris #404BR, 396BR & 395AR

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August 6, 2017

Irises are a genus of three hundred species of flowering perennials named after the Greek goddess who was said to have rode rainbows, so named because of the rainbow of colors the plant is famous for. Irises, whose scientific name is Iris, is the largest genus of the Iridaceae family. Many of the three hundred species are natural hybrids. Once commonly called Flags, Irises are native to the temperate regions of the Northern Hemisphere, especially Asia and Eurasia.

Irises like full sun and will grow in nearly every soil type, although they prefer a neutral to slightly acidic, well-drained soil. Without enough sun, typically requiring at least six hours a day, the flower will not bloom. It is said that Irises can withstand drought that would kill most all other flowers. If the soil is too sandy, or clayish, organic matter such as compost should be added. In addition to being drought-tolerant, this flower is also deer-resistant, however the plant is vulnerable to borers, which can eat its roots.

Growing to a height of one to three feet, depending on the species, the flowers of this plant sit atop long, erect stems and appears fan-shaped with symmetrical six-lobed blooms. Three sepals drop downwards, while the three petals stand upright, although some smaller species have all six lobes pointing directly outward. Most Irises bloom in early summer, although some hybrids will re-bloom again later in the growing season. Though purple is its predominate color, the blooms also come in pink, orange, yellow, blue, white and a multi-color. Besides humans, these flowers also attract hummingbirds and butterflies.

What make the Iris somewhat unusual in a typical garden in my neck of the woods, is its rhizomes, which are fleshy, root-like stems of the plant from which it roots. The rhizomes should be exposed, unlike that of bulbs, because they need some sun and air to help keep them somewhat dry. If covered by dirt, or crowded out by other plants, the rhizomes will rot. If the rhizomes appear rotten and/or diseased, let them dry out in the sun for a few days, and any healthy looking piece can be replanted.

Clusters of the plant should be divided every three or four years to keep the plant vigorous. The plant should be divided in late summer or early fall. Do not trim the leaves back during the summer, as they carry on the photosynthesis process until late fall. Brown tips should be cut off, and the stalks of the deadheads should be cut down to the rhizomes to discourage rotting. Irises should not be mulched, as mulching retains moisture and too much moisture will rot the rhizomes.

If I am fortunate to have you view my photographs and you find the color saturation too much or the color schemes of the mats do not match either themselves or the photograph, please let me know via a comment. Being color-blind, what might look great to me might look like sh*t to everyone else!

Steven H. Spring
Earth

Flowers #197B, 177A, 191AR, 187A & 178A

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July 29, 2017

The Yucca plant in these photographs is a specie of broad-leaf, flowering evergreen whose botanical name is Yucca Filamentosa. It is native to the beaches and sand dunes of southeastern United States, growing as far north as Maryland and as far west as Louisiana. It has also been naturalized to regions in France, Italy and Turkey. A member of the Asparagaceae family, it is commonly called Adam’s Needle, Spanish Bayonet, Needle Palm or just plain Yucca, which is what I know it as. Though it resembles a small palm, it is more closely related to Lilies.

Native Yuccas grow in dry, sandy or even rocky conditions, growing best in well-drained soil. They prefer the full sun, but tolerate the shade, growing even in complete shade. It is both deer and rabbit tolerate, and also handles drought well. Its rigid, sword-shaped, sharp-tipped three-inch wide green leaves (with blue overtones) grow to a length of nearly three feet long. The leaves form a foliage cluster approximately two to three feet in both height and width, and all originate from the taproot, taking the form of a rosette. The leaves are adorned with long, curly fibers that peel back as the leaf grows longer and longer.

The Yucca plant is solely pollinated by the Yucca Moth, which relies on the plant exclusively for its survival. In late spring, an erect spike of a flowering stalk grows up from the center of the rosette, though many plants will not bloom for several years. The flower cluster is called an inflorescence, and is made up of several dozen individual two-inch long, creamy-white, bell-shaped flowers growing downward. The typical stalk grows up to a height of four to six feet tall, although they can get as tall as twelve feet, depending on your region. These stalks grow taller in warmer climates, and shorter in colder regions. The bloom time, as always, depending on your region, ranges from June through August.

These stalks should be pruned after all the blooms die. However, the blossoms should be allowed to mature into pods that split open, releasing several seeds. There is some debate as to whether or not the plant dies after blooming. Some say yes, others no. Two summers ago, one of my Yuccas did die over the winter after blooming. However, the plant in these photos seems to have survived this past winter. I’m no botanist, and far from being very knowledgeable about flora, but my guess is that maybe this has more to due with the age of the plant than just the typical bloom cycle. If your Yucca does die, this plant also propagates with many seedlings growing up from the taproot and broken pieces of roots. Yuccas have deep taproots, which can be very difficult to dig up the entire root system. Young, small Yuccas can spout up from the roots in a few months or the following year.

If I am fortunate to have you view my photographs and you find the color saturation too much or the color schemes of the mats do not match either themselves or the photograph, please let me know via a comment. Being color-blind, what might look great to me might look like sh*t to everyone else!

Steven H. Spring
Earth

Senator Lindsey Graham Is A Coward

July 28, 2017

Thursday afternoon, South Carolina senator Lindsey Graham, a Republican, had this to say about the Republican Party’s latest attempt to repeal the Affordable Care Act (i.e., ObamaCare), “I’m not going to vote for a bill that is terrible policy and horrible politics just because we have to get something done.”

Graham further called the so-called skinny repeal a “disaster” and “a fraud.” He went on to call it “the dumbest thing in history” and said it would drive up insurance premiums and would destabilize Wall Street markets, which in effect would destabilize world markets. The Republican Party has been trying to repeal the Affordable Care Act for eight years, and replace it with their own plan. Eight years later, they still do not have a passable alternative. How can that be? How is it that this party now controls the White House and both Houses of Congress, and yet still cannot get a bill passed?

When the Republican Party finally got around to voting on this disaster of a bill at 1:30 Friday morning, how did Graham vote? Of course, he voted for the bill, choosing to put party well ahead of the citizens of both South Carolina and America.

Lindsey Graham should be ashamed of himself. He act of cowardice is an embarrassment to both his state and country. His yes vote on the skinny repeal, despite repeatedly calling it derogatory names all day and night is exactly what is wrong with America’s broken political system, a system controlled by Big Business and Big Money.

Senator Graham was right about one thing. His vote was indeed horrible politics.

Steven H. Spring
Earth

Lilies #3326AR, 3362AR, 3361AR, 3324AR & 3327AR

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July 22, 2017

Lilies, whose scientific name is Lilium, has more than one hundred gorgeous species in its family. However, there are many plants that have Lily in their common name; yet not all are true Lilies. A few examples of this misnomer are Day Lilies, Calla Lilies, Peace Lilies, Water Lilies and Lilies Of The Valley. True Lilies are mostly native throughout the temperate climate regions of the northern hemisphere of planet Earth, although their range can extend into the northern subtropics as well. This range extends across much of Europe, Asia, Japan and the Philippines and across southern Canada and throughout most of the United States.

There are a number of different sub-species of Lilies, such as Oriental, Asiatic, Trumpet, Martagon, Longiflorum, Candidum and several others. The most commonly grown are the Orientals and the Asiatics, especially for gardeners in more northern regions. Both the Oriental and Asiatic sub-species are hybrids. They are possibly my most favorite flower to photograph, as their design and colors makes it so easy to do so. Friends might think I am a little nuts when I tell them that they like having their picture taken, as they are so photogenic.

Asiatic Lilies, who gets its name because they are native to central and eastern Asia, are probably the easiest to grow, reproduce effortlessly and are very winter hardy. A healthy bulb can often double in size from one season to the next, and produces many smaller bulblets near the surface of the soil. Asiatics can reach heights up to six feet tall and have long, slim, glossy leaves, all the while producing flowers in a wide variety of colors, including white, pink, plum, yellow, orange and red. The one color in which they do not bloom is true blue. Blooming in June and July (depending on one’s region), the flowers produce no fragrance, unlike that of Orientals. Another distinguishing difference between the two is its petals. Whereas Asiatics have smooth edges, Orientals are rough.

Oriental Lilies, native to Japan, are a little harder to grow and tend to reproduce much more slowly, mainly by bulblets sprouting near the surface of the soil. They look somewhat like a football when they first surface from the soil, rather pointy, and its leaves hugging the stem tightly. Their deep green leaves are wider, further apart and less numerous than those of the Asiatics, which first come into sight similar to an artichoke in appearance. Orientals are usually taller than Asiatics, reaching a height up to eight feel tall. Because of their height, many refer to them as Tree Lilies.

Orientals tend to bloom in pastel shades of white, yellow and pink, although some such as Stargazers and Starfighters produce very deep pink blooms. One more characteristic difference between the two types is that Orientals often will be rimmed with a different color, or having two or three colors, whereas the Asiatics most often have just a single color, although there are some exceptions. This sub-specie of Lilies also blooms after Asiatics, usually in August and September, again depending on your region. Other sub-species, such as Trumpets, bloom even later, so it is possible to have Lilies blooming all summer long by planting different varieties.

Most Lilies are very easy to grow. They are not especially particular about soil neither type nor pH level. Their only requirement is a well-draining soil. Lilies grow best in full sun; however, they may thrive in partial sun as well. An interesting fact about this plant is that most Lily bulbs have very thick roots that have the ability to pull the bulb down into the soil at a depth that is most optimum for their continued survival.

If I am fortunate to have you view my photographs and you find the color saturation too much or the color schemes of the mats do not match either themselves or the photograph, please let me know via a comment. Being color-blind, what might look great to me might look like sh*t to everyone else!

Steven H. Spring
Earth

Repealing The Affordable Care Act (i.e., ObamaCare)

July 19, 2017

Just two short months ago, House members were dancing in the Rose Garden, having been invited by the president to celebrate their huge victory after passing legislation repealing The Affordable Care Act (i.e., ObamaCare), forgetting that in order for their legislation to become law it must also pass the Senate. Low and behold, news broke late Monday evening that the Senate cannot muster the fifty-one votes required to pass their version of a new health care bill.

How is it the Republican Party, who tried repealing ObamaCare nearly seventy times during the Obama presidency, has now failed for the third time in the past six months, despite controlling both Houses of Congress and the presidency? Imagine what Congress could actually accomplish if only they worked on something other than trying to repeal The Affordable Care Act. And yet Republicans are already wasting time trying to devise one more plan to repeal the act. All the while the president’s solution is to “let ObamaCare fail,” resulting in as many as fifty million Americans losing health care benefits. Is this leadership?

I’m no journalist, but if one, I would ask every Republican member of Congress and the president why they are so set in repealing The Affordable Care Act. Why not just fix what is wrong with it? The only rationale for their repeated failed attempts to repeal President Obama’s landmark legislation giving any American who wanted it health insurance is to diminish his legacy.

No other possible explanation has ever been given.

Steven H. Spring
Earth