America vs. North Korea

June 11, 2018

As the president meets this week with North Korean dictator Kim Jong-un in Singapore to try to iron out our two countries’ differences, it amazes me that no one ever addresses the question as to why North Korea hates us. Or better yet, why is America the only country they seemingly hate?

I’m no political scientist, but it doesn’t take a nuclear scientist, to figure out why Kim believes America is ready to attack any minute now; it’s leaving 30,000 troops stationed along the 38th parallel, more than sixty-five years after the Korean War ended. When you also consider that we conduct war games every year with South Korea, is there any wonder why North Korea feels threatened?

Usama bin Laden stated during a television interview that the reason why he attacked America on September 11, 2001, was because we left troops in Saudi Arabia, the most holy of land in the Islam religion after the first Gulf War ended. Not only did we learn a lesson from that horrific day in American history, we never even attempted to learn why the attack was carried out. They hate our freedom, we were told.

America likes to think it is not a militaristic empire, yet we have troops stationed on approximately eight hundred overseas bases, in all sizes and scope of missions, in nearly one hundred and fifty countries worldwide. When you consider that America dominates the world’s oceans with eleven aircraft carries, more than the rest of the world combined, we have complete domination over the entire world. Despite having nearly seven thousand nuclear missiles, we live in fear that some third-rate dictator might be on the verge of obtaining one nuclear weapon that might be able to reach mainline America.

As we currently bomb seven countries (Afghanistan, Iraq, Libya, Pakistan, Somalia, Syria and Yemen) on a somewhat semi-regular basis, where has all this money spent on our military got us? Our nation’s entire outdated infrastructure has been rated a D+ by engineers in their latest biennial report, as the only thing we modernize is our military.

I close by quoting a left-wing, radical-pacifist (I write sarcastically), five-star general and president, Dwight D. Eisenhower, who said in his farewell address to the nation on January 17, 1961; “…we must guard against the acquisition of unwarranted influence, whether sought or unsought, by the military-industrial complex. The potential for the disastrous rise of misplaced power exists and will persist.”

Steven H. Spring
Earth

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Why Do They Hate Us?

January 21, 2018

With the news that North and South Korea will march as one nation during the opening parade of nations in the upcoming winter Olympics, to be held in Pyeongchang, South Korea, along with their women’s hockey teams playing as one, a question needs to be addressed; is the U.S. a deterrent to peace in the Korean Peninsula? During 2000, in an attempt to reconcile relations between the two countries, North and South Korea announced plans to build a rail line and highway connecting the two countries, which was completed three years later.

Another question that needs to be asked is why North Korea hates us so much they are willing to risk complete nuclear annihilation. Why is it that the U.S. seems to be the only country North Korea seems hell-bent on waging war against? I’m no political scientist, nor military strategist, but the answer to both questions seems to me is that we still have thirty thousand troops stationed along the 38th parallel, sixty-five years after the Korean War ended. Making matters worse, our military conducts regular war games with South Korea, the most recent just last month. Is there any wonder why North Korean leaders fear another war with America?

In a television interview after the start of both the Afghan and Iraqi wars, Osama bin Laden stated he attacked America on September 11th because we left troops stationed in Saudi Arabia, the most sacred land in the Islam religion, after the Gulf War. Have we failed to learn any lessons from all our military engagements and foreign policy debacles over the past sixty-five years?

Steven H. Spring
Earth

America v. North Korea

August 10, 2017

Tuesday morning, I awoke to news that America is about to become militarily engaged in the Philippines, chasing ISIL rebels throughout the jungle nation. I spent a lot of time in the PI (that’s what sailors called it) while in the Navy during the late ‘70s. Even back then, we were warned to avoid certain areas of the archipelago because of guerilla rebels fighting back against the tyrannical rule of Ferdinand Marcos, whom we helped remain in power and very wealthy, all the while his countrymen lived in extreme poverty.

Great, I thought, just what we need, yet one more military endeavor to go along with all the others. Since the horrific attack on September 11, 2001, the U.S. has invaded or are conducting drone missile attacks in Iraq, Afghanistan, Pakistan, Libya, Yemen, Somalia and Syria. This does not include smaller, ongoing operations such as sending “advisors” and aircraft into Uganda in 2011 in search of Joseph Kony, or the three hundred troops sent to Cameroon in 2015 to help that nation combat its own rebels. Not to mention the occasional talk of taking aggressive action against Iran. Now, the president wants to add the Philippines to this ever-growing list?

When I turned on the television later that evening to catch up on the day’s news, I was shocked to hear potential war in the PI was no longer news, and that in response to Pentagon intelligence reports indicating that North Korea now has a miniature nuclear warhead capable of being launched atop an ICBM missile, the president boasted that country would be “met with fire and fury like the world has never seen.” Before nuclear war breaks out on the Korean peninsula, we must remember that the Pentagon said the very same thing four years ago.

With a nuclear triad consisting of sixty-eight hundred missiles capable of striking anywhere on Earth, why are we so worried because one more country might have the ability to so do with one nuke? I am as much a pacifist as Edwin Starr, and despise nukes even as a means of electrical power, let alone weapons of mass destruction, but what gives us the right to possess nuclear weapons, yet no other country, or just a select few has the right to do the same? Kim Jong-un might appear hell-bent on waging war on America, but is he really crazy enough to face annihilation of his country by launching a single nuke at America?

With an annual defense budget of nearly $900 billion, we spend nearly as much on our military as the rest of the world combined. When combined with our intelligence agencies, we spend nearly $1.5 trillion on defense and intelligence related expenditures every year. Moreover, this does not include America’s ultra secret intelligence budget. Since September 11th, our government has built up such a top-secret network of intelligence agencies that no one knows how much it cost, how many it employs or how many agencies it runs. The defense budget itself has nearly doubled since 2000, yet where has all this spending gotten us? As a nation, we live in fear of another September 11th attack; all the while, our country is falling apart. America is bankrupting itself and it is not from our spending on Social Security, Medicare and Medicaid. It is from our imperialistic attitude and our attempt to dominate the world we call planet Earth.

In a rather sad, ironic twist, America is by far the world’s largest arms dealer, again nearly selling as many armaments as the rest of the world combined. Thus, not only are we bankrupting ourselves with our military spending, but we are also heavily arming the rest of the world. One must remember that America armed Saddam Hussein when he was at war with Iran in the 1980s and we armed Osama bin Laden when he fought the Russians in Afghanistan, also during the ‘80s. America has a very extensive history of arming and supporting malevolence dictators and lunatics, in the name of what is best for this country, not necessarily what is best for the rest of the world.

In his January 17, 1961 farewell address to the nation, President Dwight D. Eisenhower warned the country to beware of the mighty military-industrial complex. President Eisenhower stated “…we must guard against the acquisition of unwarranted influence, whether sought or unsought, by the military-industrial complex. The potential for the disastrous rise of misplaced power exists and will persist.” Coming from a five-star general, America should have listened.

Steven H. Spring
Earth